Category: BUSINESS

אריה ברלין הרצאה על שוק ההון

5 אסטרטגיות מסחר והשקעה מתקדמות ליצירת רווחים בשוק ההון.
שיטות המסחר הפרטיות שלי, שפיתחתי באופן אישי לאורך יותר מעשור!
אפשרות למסחר רגוע עם מעט זמן מסך ותוצאות יוצאות דופן.
איך מייצרים רווח קבוע מתיק ההשקעות שלך, לא משנה אם המניות שקנית עולות או יורדות.
תוכל להתמקד בסגנון המסחר שהכי מתאים לאופי ולאישיות שלך, ולהתמקצע בו כדי להפוך אותו “לביצת הזהב” שלך.
תדע איך לדעת מראש מתי מניה צפויה לשנות כיוון, כדי להרוויח מקסימום תשואה מהתנועה החדשה.
תנצל בצורה הטובה ביותר רגעים של פאניקה בשוק, כדי לעשות רווח מהיר ומוגדל!
תלמד איך ניתן להרוויח באמצעות דיבדנדים, בתקופות של “קיפאון” גם כשהשוק לא זז.
תדע לקרוא את המסרים הסודיים שמתחבאים מאחורי תבניות התנועה של מניות, ולהפוך אותם להזדמנויות לרווח.
תוכל לתרגל כל נושא שתלמד, כבר במהלך הקורס תוך כדי התמיכה והליווי שלי.

first Session: Team Functioning
  • Build common language around team
  • Establish a spring communication plan
  • Participates in meetings
  • Volunteers to carry out the team’s work
first Session: Team Functioning
  • Build common language around team
  • Establish a spring communication plan
  • Participates in meetings
  • Volunteers to carry out the team’s work

Self-Referential Strategy Frameworks

This trap is perhaps the most insidious, because it can snare even managers who, having successfully avoided the planning and cost traps, are trying to build a real strategy. In identifying and articulating a strategy, most executives adopt one of a number of standard frameworks. Unfortunately, two of the most popular ones can lead the unwary user to design a strategy entirely around what the company can control.

All of this is eminently sensible advice that every manager would be wise to follow. However, most managers do not. Instead, most use the idea that a strategy emerges as events unfold as a justification for declaring the future to be so unpredictable and volatile that it doesn’t make sense to make strategy choices until the future becomes sufficiently clear. Notice how comforting that interpretation is: No longer is there a need to make angst-ridden decisions about unknowable and uncontrollable things.

English Group Meeting

Worse, actually choosing a strategy entails making decisions that explicitly cut off possibilities and options. An executive may well fear that getting those decisions wrong will wreck his or her career. The natural reaction is to make the challenge less daunting by turning it into a problem that can be solved with tried and tested tools. That nearly always means spending weeks or even months preparing a comprehensive plan for how the company will invest in existing and new assets and capabilities in order to achieve a target—an increased share of the market, say, or a share in some new one. The plan is typically supported with detailed spreadsheets that project costs and revenue quite far into the future.

This is a truly terrible way to make strategy. It may be an excellent way to cope with fear of the unknown, but fear and discomfort are an essential part of strategy making. In fact, if you are entirely comfortable with your strategy, there’s a strong chance it isn’t very good. You’re probably stuck in one or more of the traps I’ll discuss in this article.
first Session: Team Functioning
  • Build common language around team
  • Establish a spring communication plan
  • Participates in meetings
  • Volunteers to carry out the team’s work
first Session: Team Functioning
  • Build common language around team
  • Establish a spring communication plan
  • Participates in meetings
  • Volunteers to carry out the team’s work

Self-Referential Strategy Frameworks

This trap is perhaps the most insidious, because it can snare even managers who, having successfully avoided the planning and cost traps, are trying to build a real strategy. In identifying and articulating a strategy, most executives adopt one of a number of standard frameworks. Unfortunately, two of the most popular ones can lead the unwary user to design a strategy entirely around what the company can control.

Meeting does not exist: 87185792904.

All of this is eminently sensible advice that every manager would be wise to follow. However, most managers do not. Instead, most use the idea that a strategy emerges as events unfold as a justification for declaring the future to be so unpredictable and volatile that it doesn’t make sense to make strategy choices until the future becomes sufficiently clear. Notice how comforting that interpretation is: No longer is there a need to make angst-ridden decisions about unknowable and uncontrollable things.

Strategic Planning Meeting

Worse, actually choosing a strategy entails making decisions that explicitly cut off possibilities and options. An executive may well fear that getting those decisions wrong will wreck his or her career. The natural reaction is to make the challenge less daunting by turning it into a problem that can be solved with tried and tested tools. That nearly always means spending weeks or even months preparing a comprehensive plan for how the company will invest in existing and new assets and capabilities in order to achieve a target—an increased share of the market, say, or a share in some new one. The plan is typically supported with detailed spreadsheets that project costs and revenue quite far into the future.

This is a truly terrible way to make strategy. It may be an excellent way to cope with fear of the unknown, but fear and discomfort are an essential part of strategy making. In fact, if you are entirely comfortable with your strategy, there’s a strong chance it isn’t very good. You’re probably stuck in one or more of the traps I’ll discuss in this article.
first Session: Team Functioning
  • Build common language around team
  • Establish a spring communication plan
  • Participates in meetings
  • Volunteers to carry out the team’s work
first Session: Team Functioning
  • Build common language around team
  • Establish a spring communication plan
  • Participates in meetings
  • Volunteers to carry out the team’s work

Self-Referential Strategy Frameworks

This trap is perhaps the most insidious, because it can snare even managers who, having successfully avoided the planning and cost traps, are trying to build a real strategy. In identifying and articulating a strategy, most executives adopt one of a number of standard frameworks. Unfortunately, two of the most popular ones can lead the unwary user to design a strategy entirely around what the company can control.

Meeting ID 95068523600
Topic Strategic Planning Meeting
Meeting Status Waiting - Not started

Refresh is needed to change status.

Start Time יום רביעי, דצמ 22, 2021 12:00 PM
Timezone Atlantic/Azores
Duration 60
Join via Zoom App Join
Join via Web Browser Join

All of this is eminently sensible advice that every manager would be wise to follow. However, most managers do not. Instead, most use the idea that a strategy emerges as events unfold as a justification for declaring the future to be so unpredictable and volatile that it doesn’t make sense to make strategy choices until the future becomes sufficiently clear. Notice how comforting that interpretation is: No longer is there a need to make angst-ridden decisions about unknowable and uncontrollable things.

Marketing Team Meeting

Worse, actually choosing a strategy entails making decisions that explicitly cut off possibilities and options. An executive may well fear that getting those decisions wrong will wreck his or her career. The natural reaction is to make the challenge less daunting by turning it into a problem that can be solved with tried and tested tools. That nearly always means spending weeks or even months preparing a comprehensive plan for how the company will invest in existing and new assets and capabilities in order to achieve a target—an increased share of the market, say, or a share in some new one. The plan is typically supported with detailed spreadsheets that project costs and revenue quite far into the future.

This is a truly terrible way to make strategy. It may be an excellent way to cope with fear of the unknown, but fear and discomfort are an essential part of strategy making. In fact, if you are entirely comfortable with your strategy, there’s a strong chance it isn’t very good. You’re probably stuck in one or more of the traps I’ll discuss in this article.
first Session: Team Functioning
  • Build common language around team
  • Establish a spring communication plan
  • Participates in meetings
  • Volunteers to carry out the team’s work
first Session: Team Functioning
  • Build common language around team
  • Establish a spring communication plan
  • Participates in meetings
  • Volunteers to carry out the team’s work

Self-Referential Strategy Frameworks

This trap is perhaps the most insidious, because it can snare even managers who, having successfully avoided the planning and cost traps, are trying to build a real strategy. In identifying and articulating a strategy, most executives adopt one of a number of standard frameworks. Unfortunately, two of the most popular ones can lead the unwary user to design a strategy entirely around what the company can control.

Meeting ID 94694773736
Topic Marketing Team Meeting
Meeting Status Waiting - Not started

Refresh is needed to change status.

Start Time יום שישי, דצמ 17, 2021 12:00 PM
Timezone Atlantic/Azores
Duration 60
Join via Zoom App Join
Join via Web Browser Join

All of this is eminently sensible advice that every manager would be wise to follow. However, most managers do not. Instead, most use the idea that a strategy emerges as events unfold as a justification for declaring the future to be so unpredictable and volatile that it doesn’t make sense to make strategy choices until the future becomes sufficiently clear. Notice how comforting that interpretation is: No longer is there a need to make angst-ridden decisions about unknowable and uncontrollable things.